Twitter, Facebook not the fad Equidaily’s Merrow thought

18 thoughts on “Twitter, Facebook not the fad Equidaily’s Merrow thought”

  1. Alright Sid –

    I haven’t jumped on the Twitter bandwagon either.
    So I heretofore challenge you to come up with five really good reasons why I should.

    1)
    2)
    3)
    4)
    5)

    Granted I’m not a member of the so called “old media” and I’m not in this blogging game to make a buck, but please give me examples of how Twitter can make me a better horse racing fan while not overloading myself with high-tech gadgetry.

    Thanks and Happy Thanksgiving. 😉

  2. Knight, thanks, and hope you also had a nice thanksgiving. You aren’t in the news media, but as a racing blogger, how ’bout this:

    1. You could expose your blog and your contests to a wider group of people.

    2. You could connect in real time with a wider fan base to discuss racing in real time.

    3. You can get news , including stakes results, maiden winners, etc., instantaneously from around the country and world.

    4. you can connect 1-on-1 with many racing insiders who frequently tweet.

    5. You will meet people outside racing that you might share other interets with and maybe introduce to racing.

  3. Sid, have another old media type to add to the list, Chicago harness writer Larry Hamel is on Twitter.

    Knight, you can start out real easy. Set your RSS feed to post to Twitter, check twitterfeed.com for one way. You can set Facebook fan pages to post to Twitter too.

    Reason #6 is you are giving people their choice of how to keep up with your posts.

    Now that Twitter has lists, it’s much easier to follow topics and find other people to follow by checking others’ lists.

    You also don’t have to be following someone to read their posts, so search finds all posts, not just those from who you are following.

  4. Sid,

    I remember, it must have been the winter of 1985, mid-80s anyway, Bill Oppenheim presided over an organizational meeting for the formation of a Ky turf writers association, held at the Thoroughbred Club, and he dragged me along. I don’t remember much about what was decided at that meeting, except for one thing. Bill raised the question whether or not membership should be open to electronic media. You could tell the issue had not even occurred to most of the people there, and, by acclamation, it was decided that membership should be restricted to print journalists. After all, there was no such thing as an online journalist. That was 25 years ago, so I guess you just have to give them time.

  5. Janine, thanks for info…knight should be able to use that.

    Roger, that’s a great footnote to this post from someone who was there when the question was first posed…how amazing!

  6. Sid,

    I think I like your response to TKS almost as much as the post.

    Twitter has become my morning newspaper notched towards the things I enjoy: racing, Buffalo, top chef, breaking news. I’ve found it fascinating to follow real time.

    I have found that one has to have self restraint when attending a sporting event to not be totally obsessed with it and to enjoy the venue he/she is at and not updating your twitter/facebook status constantly (rude to those you are around and you may actually miss something). Like anything it has to be used in moderation.

  7. Sid,

    Twitter and the other social media are a sign of times, with the print media going away. Look at the TVG guys they jumped on and are in contact with the followers. BTW:I get all my info from the web and I don’t read the newspaper anymore either.

  8. larry, i, too, have radically changed my percentage of intake from paper to web/new media to proportions of 10/90.

    Geno, very good points about moderation. i, too, as i told larry above, now rely on it for most of my morning news.

  9. Sid,

    Electronic media is the cutting edge of every aspect of information services, even though the print publishers are dragging their feet because they don’t know how to make it pay. There is a strong chance that it won’t in the traditional way.

    So they are being left behind. Just look at the “interactive” elements of the major print publications in racing.

    They are stiff, over-formulated, and boring. The lively work and exciting commentary are taking place elsewhere, on such as this blog and the others which are exploring electronic media the way that Daniel Boone explored uncharted streams and forests.

    All these are engaging the audience directly and are stimulating commentary that is fresh. It’s no wonder all this is making some people uncomfortable. The new media is not under control, not beholden to the established power structure, and not likely to look for “permission” from those who used to have power in the game.

    The future is in the present tense.

    Frank.

  10. Sid, my responses underneath your Top 5 list:

    1. You could expose your blog and your contests to a wider group of people.

    TKS: Actually I never want the blog to become “too big”.
    I know this from experience as I’ve been conducting contests since my days at AOL back in 1996.
    It’s easier to score 20 people than 200. 😉

    My main goals are to document my travels and travails at the racetrack. If I look back at the end of the year and have a racing diary I’m sure to be quite satisfied with it.

    2. You could connect in real time with a wider fan base to discuss racing in real time.

    TKS: I speak for myself and not other bloggers but when I leave the computer, I find serenity. At what point does high-tech gadgetry become too much? Everyone should be able to make that call. I do not want to broadcast to the world that “I will be at Pimlico to wager on the 5 horse in the 5th race”. That’s not me. Besides that’s not a good way to proceed in the parimutuel enviroment.

    3. You can get news , including stakes results, maiden winners, etc., instantaneously from around the country and world.

    TKS: Again I have monitors at the simulcasts that I check for this if I have to. The tele-theaters that I attend have web access so DRF/Equibase results will have that info and much more in a “professional” and accurate format.

    4. you can connect 1-on-1 with many racing insiders who frequently tweet.

    TKS: The human element is important to me when I step away from the computer. While I’m open to the idea that Twitter may expose people to mine (and other favorites on my blog roll) but I think the better blogs find their way to the top of the heap – albeit slowly. If anything, I think most of us are really looking for a niche audience that loyally participates in commenting or voting in polls, etc.

    I think the handful of pioneers among the racing bloggers have established that loyal audience but I hear them mumbling to themselves: “just when we thought we were winning the rat race, along comes faster rats”. 😉

    The quality of information on blogs will only get better as horse racing fans become experienced year after year.
    But it won’t be because of Twitter. The bar keeps getting raised annually and horse racing will be better for it.

    5. You will meet people outside racing that you might share other interests with and maybe introduce to racing.

    TKS: This is my first year of blogging and you’re right I did meet several people who have blogs or are racing photographers who work at the track or are personalities that are recognizable among fans around the country
    But I didn’t need Twitter for that.

    I’m still a fandi-capper and that requires focus. I’m not a socializer at the track but I understand that may work for other bloggers if you’re into having a beer and telling Letterman jokes from the previous evening.
    Hey whatever float your boat. 😀

    Sorry I rambled on but the bottom line is….
    if you’re doing online business I can see how Twitter may contribute to increased traffic to blogs/racing websites. But for ordinary folks like myself we have to ask how much work are you willing to put in without burning out by the end of the month?

  11. I am going to take Janine’s advice and do further exploration on Twitter before proceeding slowly. If it works for me you’ll hear about it. If not. Twitter maybe for other people. I’ve seen the Twitter comments in action on the Meadowlands website. It is a sparse list at this time, but I have no doubt that it will grow in the future.

    But I have a feeling that it’s working in reverse.
    The established website traffic is making the public know that the Meadowlands is “on Twitter” rather than the other way around. An inauspicious beginning perhaps. 😉

    Lastly, I love Frank Mitchell’s quote:
    The new media is not under control, not beholden to the established power structure, and not likely to look for “permission” from those who used to have power in the game.

    That’s one of the strengths of blogging. I see no reason to hold back anything in the way of commentary. The old guard should be well prepared for bloggers commenting on how poorly racetracks are run, or how the takeout rates have killed the bettors and put them out of circulation. Or “that Aqueduct saddling area sucks!”.

    Well hey it does! 😀

  12. Knight, I gave you 5 suggestions ’cause you asked for ’em, but i’m sure someone else could give you 5 different ones, and they may or may not suit you, either.

    bottom line: you, as you say, will look into it, and if you decide to use it, fine; otherwise, fine, 2.

    it’s not for everyone, and my post was really directed more to the journalistic side of the equation, where in between the chatter there’s a lot of “news” floating around that someone of, say, Steve Haskin’s standing might find useful for professional reasons. This is why my post was directed to the journalists that haven’t experimented with the medium, yet.

  13. To The_Knight_Sky:

    1. Promote the sport you love.
    2. Promote the sport you love.
    3. Promote the sport you love.
    4. Promote the sport you love.
    5. Promote the sport you love.

    SUPPORT THE SPORT!

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